Waste Not, Want Not – the story of how measuring edible food waste for one month changed how we viewed food. – ebook

A few months back, I put the kids through one of my famous family experiments (not again mom!!!) where for one month we weighed every ounce of edible food that was thrown out.

Good food that happens to be crusts

By month’s end, we totaled over 20 pounds of good edible food that was thrown in the trash. I’m not talking about apple or potato peels here, I’m talking about pizza crust, vegetables that were pushed to the side, even prepared food that fell on the floor.

It was appalling. Not only were we wasting food but I was also wasting 20 pounds of food’s worth of money.

As a result, we’ve made some changes on how I buy, cook, and store our food.

This story got picked up by WMUR in NH and ran on the news show as a featured segment.

Attached to this post is the ebook (.pdf) file of what we did and how. It also explains how you can do this in your household if you desire (which, trust me,  if you have kids would be a great educational exercise).

waste not want not 3-10 – the story of how measuring edible food waste for one month changed how we viewed food.

1 Comment

Filed under ebook, Food Savings, How Much Edible Food Do You Throw Out?, Teaching kids, The Family

One response to “Waste Not, Want Not – the story of how measuring edible food waste for one month changed how we viewed food. – ebook

  1. Nicely done. I love the experiments you do with your family. When mine were home we did similar things. One summer we even created a cookbook (what do you do with 6 kids age 16-18). I need to write a post abut that. Thank you for the idea. Back to what to do with the waste. I read you e-book, apple peels make a nice pectin when reduced down with a little water you can use it to naturally sweeten foods you bake. I freeze mind to store it longer. The potato peels I use when I plan on making bagels. The potato peel water makes for a glossy shine on the bagels. Granted I haven’t made homemade bagels since the nest has been empty. I live next to a farmer who collects some of my food waste for his flock, farm animals and some for his compost pile. If I haven’t turned the stale bread in croutons or bread pudding, the birds, and yes even the squirrels, seem to appreciate the treat.

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