Lesson 1546: 2017 NH Border-to-border walk V2

Last night Griffin and I figured out the route we’re going to take for this year’s NH border-to-border (width) walk. We’ve allowed 9 days (plus one extra if needed) to cover a little over 100 miles. If you remember, last year’s walk did a job on our bodies and while we had a wonderful time, it was a little painful. This year we’re limiting the daily mileage to allow our bodies a chance to recuperate each day. As we will also be walking close to our home (and because where we are walking, in some places there aren’t any hotels) we will be picked up and will sleep at our house during the middle days. We’ll be dropped off in the morning where we left off so that we can continue.

This time we are older and wiser. Expect less in our packs, better choice of clothing, and some extra time to explore each area. We will start at the New Hampshire/Vermont border and will walk to the New Hampshire/Ocean border in Portsmouth where we’ll celebrate with a lobster roll.

More information will be shared as it is known, but for now all systems are go and we have a start date. 

 

Note: this schedule is subject to change. 

Day Start Stop Dist (miles) Total Miles Sleeping
Friday 8/4 236-262 Franklin Pierce Hwy, West Chesterfield, NH 03466 Days Inn Keene NH, 3 Ash Brook Rd, Keene, NH 03431 12.9 12.9 Days Inn
Saturday 8/5 Days Inn Keene NH, 3 Ash Brook Rd, Keene, NH 03431 The Harrisville Inn, 797 Chesham Rd, Harrisville, NH 03450 12.0 24.9 The Harrisville Inn
Sunday 8/6 The Harrisville Inn, 797 Chesham Rd, Harrisville, NH 03450 Hancock Inn, 33 Main St, Hancock, NH 03449 8.8 33.7 Hancock Inn
Monday 8/7 Hancock Inn, 33 Main St, Hancock, NH 03449 Crotched Mountain Resort, 740 2nd NH Turnpike S, Francestown, NH 03043 11.3 45 Crotched Mountain Resort
Tuesday 8/8 Crotched Mountain Resort, 740 2nd NH Turnpike S, Francestown, NH 03043 French & Rising Funeral Home, 17 S Mast St, Goffstown, NH 03045 12.9 57.9 Home
Wednesday 8/9 French & Rising Funeral Home, 17 S Mast St, Goffstown, NH 03045 433-427 Manchester Rd, Auburn, NH 03032 11.9 69.8 Home
Thursday 8/10 433-427 Manchester Rd, Auburn, NH 03032 Raymond, New Hampshire 11.4 81.2 Home
Friday 8/11 Raymond, New Hampshire Newfields, New Hampshire 12.7 93.7
Saturday 8/12 Newfields, New Hampshire Portsmouth, New Hampshire 11 104.7 Home
Sunday 8/13 EXTRA IF NEEDED EXTRA IF NEEDED EXTRA IF NEEDED EXTRA IF NEEDED EXTRA IF NEEDED

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Lesson 1545 – Lessons Learned from Charlotte’s Web – Chapter 7

Charlotte’s Web – Chapter 7 Bad News

Over time Wilbur likes Charlotte more and more and even tolerates her killing and eating insects. He is especially impressed that she anesthetizes them before she kills them – a “little service” she throws in.

Days pass and Wibur grows and gets larger and larger. He enjoyed good health and gained a lot of weight.

One day a sheep walks by the barn. “Hello” she said. “seems to me you’re putting on weight.”

Wilbur takes it as a compliment. At his age it’s a good idea to keep gaining.

“You know why they’re fattening you up, right?” asks the sheep who then goes on to tell Wibur that once truly fatten-up, he will be killed. The sheep tells Wilbur that there is a regular conspiracy of murder in the barn around the holidays.

When it’s time everyone comes together to shoot and prepare the yearly pig.

Upset, Wilbur asks Charlotte if the information is true.

Well, she tells him, the sheep has been in the barn for many years and has seen a lot of things, the story must be true. But, she adds “It’s also the dirtiest Trick I ever heard of.”

Wilbur cries that he doesn’t want to die. He wants to stay in his comfortable manure pile with all his friends breaing the beautiful air and lying in the beautiful sun.

“You shall not die” declares Charlotte.

“How?” asks Wilbur.

“That remains to be seen. But do stop crying.”

 

Chapter 7 Lessons Learned

Overtime, Wilbur and Charlotte become friends. He overlooks her objectionable eating habits and she’s very patient when Wilber cries.

Lesson Learned – Friendships take time. The longer you are with someone the more you know about them and the more tolerant and compassionate you become with regard to their behavior.

 

Wilbur is proud of his weight and thinks that one should put on weight as one gets older.

Lesson Learned –Whether you are a pig or a person, too much weight is going to kill you.

 

Wilbur hears that he’s going to be killed and he starts crying.

Lesson Learned –It’s okay to cry if you hear bad news.

 

Charlotte decides that she’s going to help Wilbur. She doesn’t know how she’s going to do it, but she’s going to try her best.  She gets Wilbur to calm down.

Lesson Learned –A good friend is priceless.

Bonus Lesson – A good friend will tell you when to stop.

Bonus Lesson – Even when things look bleak, never give up. There is always, always hope.

 

***

Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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Lesson 1544 – Mom uses pot

 

 

I had written a few weeks back on Facebook that I had started a new program that had drastically reduced my pain (so much that it let me take on that 5K-a-day challenge.) I told people that I’d talk about it when the time was right.

My article in this month’s New Hampshire Magazine came out.

The time is right.

And now I can talk about it.

I’m in New Hampshire’s therapeutic cannabis program. After years of taking narcotics (I was on a pain contract) and after taking so much Motrin that I destroyed my gut, I have finally found significant pain relief. I take a small amount of cannabis in an edible (I don’t smoke) in the morning, afternoon, and before I go to bed and it has made all the difference in the world.

Since starting this program I haven’t taken anything (not even one tiny Motrin) for pain because I haven’t needed to. Although I will always have some level of pain (arthritis and orthopedic damage) I’d say that there are days my pain level has been reduced by 80 – 90% I NEVER even came close to that with narcotics.

Some “side-effects” from using therapeutic cannabis to treat chronic pain?

  • Sleeping through the night for the first time in over a decade.
  • Reduced inflammation in my joints.
  • Eye twitching (which I’ve had non-stop for almost a year) has gone away.
  • Lower leg muscles have stopped twitching.
  • Blood pressure has gone down 29 points.

Be prepared for me to be a huge advocate of this program for those who are in chronic pain (including chronic Lyme disease) and for those who are suffering with chronic conditions.

Therapeutic cannabis is a game changer.

If you have questions, ask away. You know I live to pass on information.

Here is a link to my article in New Hampshire Magazine – Mom Goes to Pot. 

 

***

Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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Lesson 1543 – Lessons Learned from Charlotte’s Web – Chapter 6

Charlotte’s Web Chapter 6 – Summer Days

Summer arrives at the barn and with it comes warm days, flowers, and the end of school.

When you don’t have to go to school, you discover that you have a fair amount of excess time on your hands. Fern goes to the barn often to quietly sit and visit Wilbur. In fact she goes so often that the barn mates accept her as an equal and lay calmly at her feet.

In July Mr. Zuckeman, along with Avery and Fern harvest the hay. They cut, rake, pitch and load the hay so that it can then be transferred to the barn ensuring a good supply of food year-round for the animals.

Songbirds are plentiful in the summer and you often hear the beautiful calls of white-throated sparrows, phoebe teeters and song sparrows.

There is always a lot for children to do in the summer – eat clover heads, have ice-cold drinks, and even taking apart the spit on a weed stalk to find the worm inside.

On one such idyllic day, the goose’s eggs begin to hatch. Charlotte is the first to see a gosling hatch and she makes an announcement to the barn congratulating the goose on the results of her effort and patience.

After finding out that there are seven eggs, Charlotte tells the goose that seven is a lucky number.

“Luck had nothing to do with this.” Said the goose. “It was good management and hard work.”

It turns out that in the beginning there were eight eggs, but one turned out to be a dud. The goose gives the egg to Templeton the rat with the warning that he could have the egg, but if he ever bothered the baby chicks, he’d be sorry. Even still, the goose parents were concerned about Templeton. “And with good reason. The rat had no morals, no conscience, no scruples, no consideration, no decency, no milk of rodent kindness, no compunctions, no higher feeling, no friendliness, no anything.”

Once the rat is gone with the rotten egg, the mama goose leads her newborns out of the nest and into the world. When Mr. Zuckerman comes to the barn with Wilbur’s super he spots the tiny baby geese. “Now isn’t that lovely!”

 

 

Chapter 6 Lessons Learned

 

Fern goes to the barn each day to quietly sit by Wilbur. After a while the other barn mates begin to accept her.

Lesson Learned – You’ll be more readily accepted if you quietly observe and be respectful to the group you’re with.

 

In July the farmer harvests the hay for his animals.

Lesson Learned – Remember that old fable about the ant and the grasshopper? This. Do your work now so that you can live off it later.

 

In the summer there is so much to do right outside your front door, you’d be busy for days on end.

Lesson Learned –Put down the phone and go for a walk.

 

Summer is the time for birds to be around.

Lesson Learned –Birds are lot more enjoyable when you know what species they are and what songs they sing. Buy a bird field guide and take it on that walk I suggested above.

 

When Charlotte sees the first goose egg hatch, she immediately makes an announcement to the barn.

Lesson Learned –It’s not easy giving birth. If someone you know has a baby, send them a HAND-WRITTEN card congratulating them on the results of their “efforts and persistence.”

 

Charlotte tells the goose that seven is a lucky number and the goose replies that the eggs hatching had nothing to do with luck.

Lesson learned – Good fortune often requires lots of dedicated hard work – there’s just no other way around it.

 

The geese give an eighth “dud” egg to the rat in return for him not bothering the chicks.

Lesson Learned –Sometimes you have to give a little in order to get a little.

 

Everyone in the barn knows that Templeton “had no morals, no conscience, no scruples, no consideration, no decency, no milk of rodent kindness, no compunctions, no higher feeling, no friendliness, no anything.”

Lesson Learned –Never vote for anyone like that. Please?

***

Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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Lesson 1542 -The power of a wave #WaveNH

So you know how I did a “5K -a-day” for a month as challenged by my son Griffin?

I decided that as long as I’m walking I might as well wave to people who drive by. Everyday, there I was in my sunglasses and wide-brim hat waving away. (You may recall that on our New Hampshire Border-to-Border walk, Griffin and I waved to people the entire length of New Hampshire. 

During my 5K challenge, one day I waved to a driver and a few minutes later he turned his car around, pulled up alongside me, and rolled down the passenger window so he could talk to me.

“Hey,” he said leaning over so I could hear him. “I just wanted you to know that I was in a bad mood and then I saw you wave at me and that made my day. Thanks.”

Incredible. It’s absolutely incredible that a small action like a wave can make such a big difference in someone’s attitude.

We must never, ever forget how powerful and uplifting it is to simply be nice to one another.

#WaveNH

 

***

Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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Mini-announcement on our 2017 NH Border-to-border walk

Griffin and I have chosen the dates for our New Hampshire 2017 Border-to-border walk from Vermont to the NH coast at Portsmouth.

We will leave from the New Hampshire/Vermont on August 5th and finish up on or before August 13th. (We’ll see how it goes.)

Now that we have a start time, we can begin work on our daily schedule which I’ll post as soon as it is ready.

Absolutely can’t wait.

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Lesson 1541 – Lessons Learned from Charlotte’s Web – Chapter 5

Charlotte’s Web Chapter 5 – Charlotte

Wilbur spends a restless night, hungry and with much on his mind. When Templeton the rat wakes him up by gnawing on a board, Wilbur thinks “Why does he have to stay up all night, grinding his clashers and destroying people’s property?”

When the goose wakes him up by her chuckling, the goose doesn’t have much sympathy for Wilbur. “I have nothing on my mind, but I’ve too many things under my behind. Have you ever tried to sleep while sitting on right eggs?

The goose then goes on to tell Wilbur that sometimes on warm days she cheats by covering the eggs with straw so that she can get away for a bit.

Finally morning comes. “Oh, beautiful day, it is here at last! Today I shall find my friend!”

Wilbur calls out to the party who addressed him before he went to bed last night.

“Stop your nonsense, Wilbur!” said the oldest sheep. “If you have a new friend here, you are probably disturbing his rest; and the quickest way to spoil a friendship is to wake somebody up in the morning before he is ready. How can you be sure your friend is an early riser?”

Wilbur apologizes to the barn occupants. Breakfast is served by Lurvy and it’s time for Wibur’s nap when he hears “Salutations!” Wilbur asks what that word means and the tiny voice explains.

“Salutations!” calls out Wilbur.

Wilbur soon discovers that the voice belongs to Charlotte, a very beautiful, near-sighted spider. “I wish I could see you, Wilbur, as clearly as you see me.” To prove that her sight didn’t get in her way, she wraps up a fly who had gotten tangled in her web. “He’ll make a perfect breakfast for me.”

“You eat flies?”

Charlotte explains that yes, she eats flies and all sorts of other things that happen to fly into her web.She can’t help it, Charlotte tells Wilbur, it’s just the way she is.

When Wilbur calls her out for such a bloodthirsty way of eating, Charlotte tells Wibur he’s one to talk. She explains that the farmer brings his food to him. He doesn’t have to work for it or figure out how to get it. He only has to be present. Charlotte has to work to survive but she’s okay with it bcause she knows that in her eating of bugs, she is also helping to keep the world population of them down.”

It’s all good.

The goose looks on from her nest. “Poor Wilbur” she thinks. He doesn’t know what is ahead for him at Christmas time.

Charlotte goes to eat her fly and Wilbur takes a nap. As he falls asleep he wonders if he can be friends with somone hwo is so “fierce, brutal, schemeing, bloodthirsty – everythings I don’t like. How can I learn to like her, even though she is pretty and of course, clever?”

Turns out he will.

Chapter 5 Lessons Learned

 

Wilbur can’t sleep because he has too much on his mind.

Lesson Learned – It’s important to calm and clear your mind before you go to sleep. What is is and whatever it is, it can certainly wait until morning. .

 

The goose admits that sometimes she “cheats” and gets time away from her eggs.

Lesson Learned –All moms need a break once in a while.

 

Finally morning arrives and Wilbur is excited to see what will happen.

Lesson Learned – Greet each day enthusiastically and be grateful for the opportunities it brings.

 

Wilbur calls out to his new friend early in the morning which bothers everyone else in the barn.

Lesson Learned –I’m going with my mother’s rule when I was growing up on this one – don’t call anyone’s house before 9 a.m..

 

Charlotte teaches Wilbur what the word “saluatations” means.

Lesson learned – An important part of friendship is what we can learn and teach each other.

 

Charlotte is near-sighted, but she can still weave a mean web.

Lesson Learned – Have a weakness? Then figure out what you do well and do that.

 

Wilbur is dismayed that Charlotte catches and eats flies.

Lesson Learned –Hey, we all gotta do what we need to do, in order to get by.

 

We learn that something bad is going to happen to Wilbur at Christmas.

Lesson Learned – Sometimes ignorance is bliss.

 

Wilbur wonders if he can be friends with a formidable female like Charlotte?

Lesson Learned – Trust me on this one, strong females can be very, very good friends.

 

***

Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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