Tag Archives: snow

Lesson 1507 – Attacking what needs to be done

 

It’s been a while since I’ve put a post up here. It’s not because I don’t think about this blog everyday (I do) it’s just that things seem to be a little overwhelming right now.

But if having 6 kids has taught me anything it’s that when things seem to happen too quickly the best way to slog through them is to simply make a list and attack what needs to be done, one item at a time.

So in that vein, here’s some news:

 

Spring Border-to-border New Hampshire walk –

Griffin (my son and border-to-border NH walking buddy) has agreed to join me in a walk *across* New Hampshire sometime this spring. I have another son who, if he is around also wants to join us.

According to Google, the trip is about 108 miles (we are starting at the New Hampshire/Vermont border and ending up on the coast in Portsmouth (where we will celebrate with Lobster rolls.) We are allocating 9 days to do it – we had learned from our walk last summer that walking on roads can be tough on our feet and bodies. We are planning on no more than 12 miles a day.

You can be sure I’ll come home with more lessons learned while we walk.

 

Spain

At the end of March, I will be going to with a friend to Spain for 8 days. She and I don’t have many plans other than to explore, eat good food, and drink some world-class wine. We’ll also be taking a side trip to France. I’ll be taking lots of photos and look forward to sharing that adventure with all of you.

 

Cancer update

I *still* have not had my skin cancer addressed (not really my fault – docs keep taking vacations and appointments keep getting moved.) I did finally get to see a plastic surgeon and it looks like the surgery is going to be a bit more extensive than I had thought. (I thought it was simply an office procedure where I drive myself in, have it done, thanked him very much, and then drove back home.) Nope. It looks like this one is a bit aggressive. The doc talked about cheek and forehead flaps  while I stuck my fingers in my ears and said “na-na-na-na-na” (if you want nightmares go ahead and google what those are.)

If I can’t have the surgery in the next few days, it will have to wait until I get back from Spain in April. I’m thinking of ordering this wig to wear until I heal.

Plant-based diet

All this talk of skin-flaps has gotten my attention. I’ve written (many times) about how diet is so important when you have a chronic disease (Lyme in my case and now cancer.) I write about it, I understand the principals, and yet I’m the first to reach for a mug of beer, some ribs, or bread dunked in olive oil.

Not anymore. You want to be motivated to make a change, have a doc tell you that he may have to slice your forehead into ribbons.

So it’s plant-based for me (although when in Spain, while I plan to be as much plant-based as possible, I do intend to partake of the local food and drink.)

Last night I prepared two meals, eggplant parmigiana with salad and corn muffins for the family and soup, flat bread with hummus, avocados and tomatoes, along with a salad for me. My kids showed a lot of interest in what I was eating – they wanted to taste the soup, wanted to know where I purchased it (Whole Foods, Engine-2 Moroccan Stew)  and wanted to know if I was full at the end of the meal (I was.)

Pro tip to parents – they still watch what you do even when they get older.

 

Chicken workshop

For New Hampshire Locals – I will be at the Lebanon Tractor Supply on March 25th from 11 – 3  with a table ready to answer any and all chicken related questions (and if I don’t know the answers, I know friends who would know.)

Stop by if you can to say “hi.”

 

Current book I’m reading

I’m reading the Autobiography of Mrs. Tom Thumb – a novel based on historical fact. I grew up in Fairfield Connecticut and often visited the Barnum museum in Bridgeport, so I already knew a fair amount about General and Mrs. Tom Thumb, but this book is absolutely fascinating. How Lavinia went from (literally) the farm to the big stage is a journey of courage, insistence, and a great deal of side-who marketing.

Once you start, I’m not sure you’ll be able to put it down.

 

 

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Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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Lesson 1506 – That’s a lot of snow

I don’t particularly watch the weather, but when my phone started buzzing last night with cancellation notifications and when I started getting phone calls from various schools, I took notice.

We are getting walloped with snow. Initial forecasts called for up to 18 inches and we just might get there before the end of the day.

This is about 1.5 hours after it started snowing.

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And this is about 2 hours later.

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Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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Lesson 1163 – Thanksgiving – It still came

We were one of the families in the northeast that spent Thanksgiving without power.

The day before Thanksgiving a heavy snow fell surprising us all. I mean we all knew that snow was in the forecast, but few of us knew that within an hour of its starting, the driving could be difficult and the trees would be covered in white. It was the kind of snow that sticks to everything. It was the kind of snow that took down trees and limbs. In our cozy house, everything was all set for the next day’s celebration, cakes and breads were cooling, the turkey was defrosted and ready to be stuffed, and the yams were set aside, ready to be baked. We had just settled down to watch “The Homecoming” (the one with the Waltons) when the house went dark.

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Losing electricity is really not that unusual for where we live. We have wires that run through the trees and even with yearly summer pruning, the town still can’t keep up with the growth. It’s hardly noteworthy when we lose our electricity, yawn, it will usually be back on soon. We found our various flashlights (note to self, collect all flashlights, check the batteries and put them in a central location) and then lit candles.

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For a few hours we read and talked by candlelight, but without TV or computer to stimulate our brains, guess what happened? We all got tired and were all asleep by 9:00 p.m. certain that we’d have power the next morning.

We didn’t.

And then we didn’t have power by Thanksgiving afternoon.

Fortunately some of the local grocery stores were open and Marc went out to get some supplies. Thanksgiving dinner for us was turkey sandwiches, cranberry sauce, nuts, and chips. It was a meal different from what had been planned but it was a meal we were grateful for just the same.

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Sure we didn’t have power, but our entire family was home and safe.

Then a funny thing happened. Instead of retreating to individual rooms to get on the internet with friends, or to go watch TV, games were pulled out, books were read and conversations were held. It was our own Homecoming, where we rediscovered our sense of family once again.

Our power returned on Friday afternoon, but here in New Hampshire, even though we didn’t have roast turkey with the trimmings, and even though we didn’t have any electricity, Thanksgiving came, it came just the same.

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Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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Filed under Mama Hen, Personal, Teaching kids, The Family

Lesson 1162 – No Children’s Blizzard here

Snow. It’s coming, and yeah, I know that I shouldn’t complain (condolences to Buffalo), but still.

This weekend, we got out our mittens, hats, scarves, and winter coats. My kids think I’m jumping the gun and blame a book I read years ago called The Children’s Blizzard (because of that book my kids CAN NOT leave the house in the winter without mittens or a pair of gloves.)

But it’s more like I saw this in Vermont when I went to pick up my son at Norwich on Friday. Yes, I know Vermont is to the north of us and that his school is situated between mountains. Continue reading

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Lesson 963 – Waiting and Wondering

We are all waiting and wondering what this storm will bring. I’ve heard reports that have included words like “catastrophic” and “historical.” I’ve already seen photo after photo of those iconic traffic snarls, the ones that always appear whenever snow ventures near the south.

And now the storm is upon us.

My son has left for work an hour early for his 50 minute ride (with me reminding him to please be careful and to *please* take advantage of room for workers to spend the night at the mountain – “we’re kind of running out of cars,” I remind him.)

And yet when I look out the window, I see only a light, delicate snow shower, the background of Christmas card scenes. Continue reading

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Lesson 958 – Sleepless in New Hampshire

And this is why mama hens never really sleep deeply once their chicks have started leaving the nest.

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He’s okay. He lost control of the car last night during the snowstorm and slammed into the guardrail *twice* while on a bridge.

When Marc and I went to pick him up at the scene the police officers showed us the first hit. I leaned over and looked at the ground far, far below and for that flash of a moment, saw what could have been. My son had been driving our tall, top heavy SUV and the only reason he didn’t careen over the side of the bridge is that an angel must have been riding alongside him in the passenger seat. Continue reading

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Lesson 957 – Comfort in the storm

This is our world right now:

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We’ve got snow and will continue to get more snow. Much more snow.

I’m staying indoors – not venturing out, preferring instead to work on some articles with approaching deadlines and reviewing students’ homework assignments. Not such a bad way to spend a stormy day. Continue reading

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Filed under Backyard Chickens, chicken care, Chicks, Holidays, Inspiration, Life Lessons, Personal, Quotable Chicks, The Family