Category Archives: The kids

Lesson 1285 – Why did the chicken cross the road?

The other day I was in the front yard with some of my chickens and quite by luck I was able to catch this video of one of our girls.

Here it is – definitive proof of why the chicken crossed the road.

Obviously it was to get to the other side.

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Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

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Filed under All things chickens, chicken care, Personal, Recipes, The Family, The kids

Lesson 1284 – Larry, Daryl and Daryl

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Many of us who are of a certain age remember watching the Newhart show (the one at the inn.) One of the funniest gags that ran throughout that show was when Larry, Darryl and his other brother Darryl, the three backwoods bumpkin brothers entered the room and announced themselves.

No matter how many times that line was said, it always caused a chuckle because it was so silly. Who gives their kids the same name?

This spring we got 4 chicks to add to our flock – two of 2 different breeds so that we had balance. One died. (She happened to be a runt and just didn’t grow.) The remaining 3 grew strong and have matured into fine adolescents.

But they’re a little unbalanced now. We have two white birds (that we’ll never be able to tell apart) and our single New Hampshire Red.

True to chick behavior, these guys go *everywhere* together. Like Frick and Frack, if you see one, you’ll soon see the other two nearby.

“Are we ever going to name those chicks?” My daughter asked this weekend.

I looked at the chicks, best of buddies and I replied, “Sure thing, we’re going to call them Frick, Frick, and Frack.”

My daughter looked at me with her largest “huh?” eyes. Who gives their chicks the same name? After a beat or two when the absurdity finally sunk in, she laughed.

I’m telling you, it never gets old.

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Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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Filed under All things chickens, chicken care, Personal, Recipes, The Family, The kids

Lesson 1283 – Lord of the flies

I’ll put it out there right now. With regard to flies, I’m a wimp.

I can handle chicken surgery, chicken blood, chicken poop, heck, I can even handle culling a chicken, but I CAN NOT handle this.

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If you are quiet, you can actually hear them buzz from inside.

A large jar filled with baked-bean-flies.

You can clean your coop all you want, you can mix things into the bedding, but if you are going to have chickens, you are going to have flies. Especially if you let them free range – poop and flies just happen.

We have found the best solution is these disgusting fly traps. You mix a God-awful solution and place it in the jar. The flies, attracted to the smell (and yes, it reeks don’t put them near the eating area) enter the chamber and then can’t find their way back out. Eventually they either die from drowning or exhaustion. It’s a very effective (and disgusting) solution.

During our worst summer with flies (I think it was 3 years ago) we were filling two of these jars a week. Yup, each week Marc would take the full jars out to the woods, dig a hole and then empty the – what he called “black baked beans with wings” into the hole and then covered them over.

This summer we’ve had enough flies to get out the traps again. I think in part it’s because of all the rain we’ve had. Regardless, they’re back in our lives (and in my nightmares.)

Once again it will be Marc emptying the traps, because even after dealing with chicken problem and after having 6 kids with all their puking and pooping, I’m still not seasoned enough to deal with the bucket-o-flies.

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Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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Filed under All things chickens, chicken care, Personal, Recipes, The Family, The kids

Lesson 1282 – Puddles of sunshine

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No, this is not a chicken that has been attacked by one of our neighborhood hawks.

It’s not an injured chicken and it’s not a dying chicken.

It’s a very smart chicken who is out in the yard taking a dirt bath in a puddle of sun while she can.

We’ve had a lot of wet weather lately, showers, storms, and even tornado warnings. Continue reading

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Filed under All things chickens, chicken care, Personal, Recipes, The Family, The kids

Lesson 1280 – Worrying about the chicks

Well that was easy.

I admit it, I’m still traumatized by my little Violet who, her first night in the coop panicked and wedged herself into a cinder block to get away from the flock. The flock ended up pecking (ripping) her butt away and little Violet died.

Talk about guilt. She was one of the sweetest little birds I’d ever had. I still get great heart sorrow thinking about her.

Which is why I now wait, wait, wait to integrate new chicks into our flock. They have to be big, they have to be strong. They have to be able to get away.

So I’ve waited, and waited. Long after I should have, they were still being kept separate.

We had started to let them mingle with the hens during the day, but every night we’d put them back into their own pen.

Safe. Safe. Always safe.

“Should we mix them in with the others?” My kids kept asking me.

Not yet.

But, this weekend, I finally took a deep breath and put our 3 chicks in the coop at night.

The next morning I hesitated. I didn’t want to go out and check on them. Sometimes chickens can be so cruel to each other. But after my second cup of coffee, there were no more excuses. I went to the coop only to discover….

That nothing had happened. Absolutely nothing.

The chicks were fine. The flock hadn’t attacked them.

In fact they were all getting along.

All is well.

All is well.

I had done all that worrying for nothing. How silly of me. I promise you the next integration time, I’ll try not to worry. Not even a tiny bit.

That is at least until*my* chicks need to re-integrate into the flock called college this September.

Then, this mama hen will resume worrying about her chicks. At least just a tiny bit.

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Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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Filed under All things chickens, chicken care, Personal, Recipes, The Family, The kids

Lesson 1279 – She’s baaaaaaaack!

Many people have been asking me about Rudd (and my son told me to tell you how it’s pronounced because he said some of his friends are saying it wrong.)

Rudd is not pronounced “Rud” (like mud) it’s pronounce “Rude” (as in “how rude!”) This, of course, opens us up to all kinds of clever jokes like:

How’d you get to be so ruuuuuudd? (lyrics from a popular song)

Don’t be Rudd! – what we say to a chicken now when she’s acting a little off.

And of course – Continue reading

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Filed under All things chickens, chicken care, Personal, Recipes, The Family, The kids

Lesson 1278 – new blog, workshop, and s’mores dip

A few things:

I’m teaching an online blog writing class. I sensed that my students were getting frustrated with “nothing to see” so I’ve created a blog-in-progress as an example (like I need to write for another blog, right? :-)). This blog will be constantly evolving as we discuss various topics (categories, keywords, widgets). I may kill it at the end of the class, I may not.

If you’re interested in seeing how a blog develops or if you want to know about my “back to fitness” journey from the devastation of Lyme disease goes, head on over.

This new blog is located here: Fit to Food

I stink at selfies, I think I need to take lessons from my daughters

I stink at selfies, I think I need to take lessons from my daughters

The chicken workshop yesterday was a lot of fun. I recorded my “presentation” and at some point, when I have *tons* of extra time, I’ll transcribe my lecture and put it into ebook format. An important part of my teaching (of any topic) is to include stories and examples. That’s what makes a subject resonate with a learner.

Trust me, I have plenty of stories.

It’s Friday and one of my chicks turns 20. Instead of a birthday cake we are having a s’mores dip. (I just might have a bite, after all it’s a celebration.) I made this for Logan’s graduation party. It couldn’t be easier and it was a HUGE hit.

 

S’mores Dip

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In a pie plate spread out a bag of milk chocolate chips.

Artfully place a bag of marshmallows on top (you’ll have a few left over, they don’t all fit.)

Place in a 450 oven for 10 minutes. The marshmallows will get nicely browned.

Serve with graham crackers.

Yum.

Have a good weekend everyone!

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Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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Filed under Personal, Recipes, The Family, The kids

Lesson 1144 – Goblins and witches and crazy people, oh my

When the kids were younger, I’d make sure they all had costumes for Halloween.

3 little halloween
I never did anything scary, not like this lady I found participating in a zombie walk

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Or this zombie bride on her iPhone (which is scary on so many levels.)

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As our family grew, so did our costume collection.

Emma is hiding in my tummy and wouldn't show for about 2 more months.

Emma is hiding in my tummy and wouldn’t show for about 2 more months.

These days, only a few of the kids get dressed up for Halloween (others only want to stay indoors and play video games online.)

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As for me, oh I’ll still put on something to greet the neighborhood kids as they come around to knock on our door,

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but as soon as that porch light turns out, I’ll be in my jammies reading one of the several good books I have going, secure in the knowledge that all my chicks know enough to keep safe when goblins, witches, and various other scary people in our town abound.

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Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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Filed under Life Lessons, members of the flock, Personal, Teaching kids, The kids

Lesson 932 – Home again

That tricky elf in a coop has finally gone back into his box (along with our Christmas Chicken) where I assure you he will be kept safe until next year.

Our flock

Our flock

For now, we are enjoying the fact that all of our chicks have returned home and that our nest is full once again.

Oh I know that as a mama hen, it’s my job to push out my little ones when the time is right, but that doesn’t mean that we can’t miss them and greatly enjoy their company when they come back to visit.

So good to see you, so very good to see you – sit down and tell me how you’ve been.

And come back they have with a roar, the kids haven’t all been together since last August. That’s a long time when you’ve grown up in a flock that has lived, worked, and tumbled around together.

Continue reading

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Filed under All things chickens, Holidays, Life Lessons, Mama Hen, members of the flock, New Hampshire, Personal, The Family, The kids, Uncategorized

Lesson 932 – Elf in a coop – December 25

Elf in a coop

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays from Eeehiyo – the elf in a coop and Carol – our Christmas Chicken.

Wishes for a healthy, prosperous, and peace-filled New Year from our flock to yours.

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Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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Filed under All things chickens, Chicken fun, Holidays, Personal, The kids, Uncategorized