Author Archives: Wendy Thomas

About Wendy Thomas

Wendy is a journalist, writer, blogger and teaches writing at Nashua Community College.

Lesson 1251 – Still at it

I’m still working at protecting these:

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For these little guys:

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(And yes, we have seen woodpeckers like these in the woods out back.)

Because someone has to speak up for them.

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Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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Lesson 1250 – Be careful, little mama

I know I’ve been a little erratic on the blog lately, please bear with me – it’s a combination of the last week of classes, upcoming finals, syllabus preparation for my summer class, work, and trying to learn all I can about best forestry practices in New Hampshire. (yup a local forester told me I needed to read some books on forestry when I challenged some of his decisions … so I did) while continuing to write articles and documents.

Been a little busy of late.

But I want to keep you updated on our mama bird in the holiday wreath situation.

She is alive and well. Marc took these photos this morning.

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We’re still trying to use the backdoor as much as possible, but I’ve also been trying to get mama bird used to people *quietly* using the front door. When I go out that way, I try to open the door slowly and I avoid eye contact. Opening the door slowly makes less noise.

Avoiding eye contact makes me feel like I’m being sneaky.

So far, so good.

We saw the male this past weekend and I was surprised to see that he had red on his head and chest. A quick look in our bird book and we were able to identify this lovely family as belonging to a house finch.

I’ve read that some of these smaller birds can have 2 sets of chicks in a season. They hatch one group, get them flying on their own, and then they lay a new clutch of eggs.

Be careful with that strategy little mama, if you’re not careful, you’re going to still have kids in high school when your friends already have their empty nests.

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Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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Lesson 1249 – Worse than the kids

This weekend, I took out my Lego Mama hen in order to take some photos.

I took this one:

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Just hanging out with my best bud.

And this one: Continue reading

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Lesson 1248 – Snow bank mining – sure sign of spring

Although we still have a few patches of snow here and there, spring has finally come to New Hampshire. How do we know for sure?

Robins have come back in full force.

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We’re starting to see these in our yards. Continue reading

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Lesson 1247 – The first fart egg of the season

Even though I’m calling this the first fart egg of the season – because we are finally digging out from under our deep litter in the hen house and are uncovering all kinds of things – it’s technically the first fart egg that we’ve *discovered* this season. It certainly could have been laid last fall when our newest crew began laying eggs.

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Fart eggs – a name that brings endless joy and chuckles to our teens – is a trial egg. It’s the result of a young hen who is just starting to get into the business of laying eggs.

When a hen first starts laying, her eggs tend to be smaller than normal. Eventually as the bird’s body gets used to what’s going on, the eggs will get larger and larger until they become full size. Continue reading

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Lesson 1246 – We’ve got your back

Ten days ago we had a snow storm. This weekend, the weather was so nice we were able to spend time in the yard cleaning up from the winter and preparing to eat our meals outside once again.

Like a few others in town (I’ve seen you) we hadn’t taken down the Christmas wreath on our porch. (remember we are the family once that kept our Christmas tree up until March 24th because of a birthday wish.) I figured that as long as we were still getting snow, it could remain. Festive is festive.

This weekend we discovered why this may or may not be a good idea. Continue reading

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Lesson 1245 – Time for a rant

I haven’t had a good rant in a while.

As you might know, our property is bordered by woods that are filled with tall pines. As a result we have tons of wildlife (darn those hawks) and a nice diversity of plant life, including the protected Lady Slipper.

A few weeks back, a letter was sent from the town (we are goverend by a town manager and a town council which consists of elected residents – I know, right?) notifying all of the abutters to the woods that the town was going to do “selective cutting” on the trees.

Selective cutting. To me that means a few trees here, a few trees there.

Apparently to our town though, selective cutting means clear cutting a large (interestingly, it’s a house lot size) “landing area for trucks”, as well as cutting down hundreds and hundreds of trees. All day we’ve been hearing tall pines crashing to the ground. Before we couldn’t see our neighbor’s house, now we will be able to tell what book they are reading on their back porch.

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I’m told the town will reap $7,000 from the downed wood. Sap money. Continue reading

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