Author Archives: Wendy Thomas

About Wendy Thomas

Wendy is a journalist, writer, blogger and the Tech Blog Manager at Constant Contact.

Lesson 1140 – Keto diet and backyard chickens

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It turns out that a Keto diet is a *very* good diet to be on if you have chickens (and want to make a thrifty dish or two.0 This one crustless quiche recipe uses 12 eggs (although to be fair it makes 12 servings so that’s really only one egg per serving.) Once made, I froze the leftovers and in the mornings I take one serving out, sprinkle more cheese on it and then heat it in the microwave.

I think this is a terrific breakfast recipe for anyone, especially older kids who sometimes are so rushed they forget to eat something for breakfast.

Here is the original recipe from I breathe I’m hungry.

It’s a low carb and gluten free breakfast casserole recipe that is hearty and easy to make!

Ingredients

• 12 oz. Jones Dairy Mild Sausage (roll)
• 10 oz pkg of frozen chopped spinach, thawed and drained
• 1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese
• 12 eggs
• 1/2 cup heavy cream
• 1/2 cup unsweetened plain almond milk
• 1/2 tsp salt
• 1/4 tsp black pepper
• 1/4 tsp ground nutmeg

Instructions

• Break up the raw sausage into small pieces and place it in a medium bowl. Squeeze any remaining liquid out of the spinach, and break it up into the same bowl as the sausage. Sprinkle the feta cheese over the mixture and toss lightly until combined. Lightly spread the mixture onto the bottom of a greased 13×9 casserole dish or 18 greased muffin cups.
• Meanwhile, in a large bowl beat the eggs, cream, almond milk, salt, pepper, and nutmeg together until fully combined. Gently pour into the pan or muffin cups until about 3/4 the way full.
• Bake at 375 degrees (F) for 50 minutes (for the casserole) or (30 minutes) for the muffin cups – or until fully set. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Notes

Approximate nutrition information per serving:
Per muffin: 137 calories, 10g fat, 1g net carbs, 8g protein
Per square: 206 calories, 16g fat, 1.4g net carbs, 12g protein

I slightly modified this recipe.

• I cooked the sausage before I assembled the casserole.
• I used ½ cup of shredded cheddar cheese (it’s what I had on hand) and I sprinkled it on top.
• I used about 1 cup of heavy cream and didn’t use any almond milk (again I didn’t have it on hand.)

Although the original recipe used a pie plate in the photo, I used a 9 x 13 casserole dish. It’s easier to cut a rectangle it into 12 servings than a circle. Cooled down servings are wrapped and put into the freezer. A quick pop into the microwave and with a hot cup of coffee, I’ve got a yummy breakfast.

 

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Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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Filed under Challenges, Food Savings, Life Lessons, New Hampshire, Personal, Recipes, Simple Thrift Tips, The Family

Lesson 1139 – A matter of time

 I finally caught up with our neighbors on the *other* side of our property. As the juveniles (delinquents) get braver and braver, they roam further and further from home, right into, you’ve guessed it, our neighbor’s property where they’ve found a wide open grass lawn just ready for yummy insect picking.I’ve tried. I’ve really tried to keep these hoodlums from their property but just like human teens, as soon as you designate something as forbidden, the kids will test you on it. Say no and they are on top of it – see you later.

Sure enough, my young flock has passed the natural boundary of the woods and is fully into the green, green grasslands on the other side.

I apologized. “I’m so sorry,” I told our neighbor. “We shoo the birds back whenever we see them nearing your property.”

“No problem at all,” she told me. “Your chickens can eat all the bugs and ticks from our lawn that they want.” This is another neighbor that has not seen a tick on any of her outdoor cats this summer. She enjoys our chickens and looks forward to seeing them scratching in her yard.

Do you know what a difference it makes when your neighbors accept your flock? (and yes, our neighbors will be getting eggs as soon as the brats start laying)

She did warn me about the large female falcon she has seen in her yard (and which she blames for the death of one of her cats.) I’ve seen the falcon twice in our yard, and my flock (even the obnoxious juveniles) knows to take heed (they all rush to hide under bushes or low hanging areas.) Our neighbor also warned me about a large fox that she has seen pacing our property line.

I know it’s just a matter of time. As I tell people in my chicken classes, if you make the decision to free-range your chickens, you make the decision to lose a few to predators. As long as you understand that, all is well.

Because I’m one who likes to have her cake and eat it too, I physically get up from my desk and check on the chickens several times a day, thinking that maybe I can keep them from harm. But I’m also a bit of a realist. Roving chickens are targets.

And I know it’s just a matter of time.

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Filed under All things chickens, Backyard Chickens, chicken care, Personal

Lesson 1138 – What’s really important about Salem, Mass

On Saturday, Marc and I decided to spend the day in Salem, Mass, about an hour drive from our house. Although Salem has a deep history that includes colonial living and seafaring life, it is, of course, for the witches that it is best known.

And boy do these guys like to celebrate their witches. For the entire month of October, the town gets its freak on. For sure, you’ll see all things witches:

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And you might even see a token nod to the town’s pirating history: Continue reading

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Filed under All things local, Life Lessons, New Hampshire, Personal, The Family

Lesson 1137 – Quotable Chicks

Friday’s Quotes for the Chicks

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Just do it. – Nike

 

What a week, what a week!

I managed to get two major articles out to my editors,  along with blog posts, teaching classes, and transporting kids to soccer games.  And I wrote an outline for a manuscript I’ll be working on during the Nanowrimo challenge. (I wrote it at a friend’s house last weekend where this little guy kept me company.)

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I didn’t think I’d be doing Nanowrimo this year (it’s a challenge where you win if you write 50,000 words in one month) because, well life is busy. But you know what? Life is always busy. Here’s the story of why I decided to do it (originally posted on nhwn.wordpress.com)

 

Well who knew? Nanowrimo – here I come Continue reading

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Filed under All things chickens, Life Lessons, Personal, Quotable Chicks

Lesson 1136 – Two little black and white birds

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Two little black and white birds sitting on a hill.

One named Jack and one named Jill.

Fly away Jack. Fly away Jill.

Come back Jack. Come back Jill.

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Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

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Filed under All things chickens, Backyard Chickens, chicken care, Personal

Lesson 1135 – Update on our sick chicken

still swollen but open eye

still swollen but open eye

Just a few days ago, I wrote about our little Silver Sebright, Isabelle and how she was dying.Isabelle had developed a solid growth on one eye (it looked like a large wart/tumor that was completely shutting her eye.) She went around for a while with the use of one eye and then her other eye started to swell shut.

What we ended up having was a blind chicken and no matter how much you love your birds, a blind chicken is not going to last long, especially during the winter months when she needs to be able to find her food and water while maneuvering around the coop. No one would have blamed me if I had put her down.

Even still, Isabelle did not seem to be in any pain, so I decided to give her a chance. Though she was completely blind, I decided to hold off and instead put her in isolation in an unused rabbit hutch. I placed food and water in a heavy ceramic dishes in the cage with her (she tipped over lighter dishes when she’d try to find them with her feet) and patiently showed her where they were located. I went out several times a day to make sure she was okay and each time I could tell that she could hear me but didn’t have a clue as to where I was. Normally a skittish bird, she sat quietly and a little scared while I stroked her feathers and talked quietly to her.

Quite frankly I didn’t have much hope for Isabelle. I gave her my version of chicken TLC – protection, water, and food (which included her favorite foods like fruit) and waited. I had my killing cone ready in the event that she started to show signs of distress. I love this little bird too much to let her suffer.

But Isabelle is a smart bird and she had other plans. Soon she figured out how to find her food and water. She nested inside a cardboard box that offered a little protection and warmth and she kept making it to the next day.

After a few days her less swollen eye surprisingly started to open up. She had plenty of bubbles in the eye and would shake her head with wetness (preventing her from rejoining the flock) but a half-blind bird is a bird that *might*, with assistance, make it through the winter. I became cautiously optimistic.

This morning when I went out to check on Isabelle, the “tumor” on her other eye had receded and that eye is also opening up. Like the other one it is wet and filled with bubbles, but now when I put my hand into her cage, she backs away from me.

Isabelle can see.

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Filed under All things chickens, Backyard Chickens, chicken care

Lesson 1134 – Columbus Day

 IMG_20141013_085003244Some discoveries are worth crowing about.
Happy Columbus Day.

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Wendy Thomas writes about the lessons learned while raising children and chickens in New Hampshire. Contact her at Wendy@SimpleThrift.com

Also, join me on Facebook to find out more about the flock (children and chickens) and see some pretty funny chicken jokes, photos of tiny houses, and even a recipe or two.

Like what you read here? Consider subscribing to this blog so that you’ll never miss a post. And feel free to share with those who may need a little chicken love.

Leave a comment

Filed under All things chickens, chicken care